Tag Archives: Silent Spring

did you know? … Our Environment


Pinterestwh_climate_banner So, this post is 11 yrs old …the numbers must be staggering now

Climate Change chief victims of global warming are women, we grow the food, walk miles for water, and gather the firewood.

Fend off Allergies … by eating more leafy greens, having high levels of folic acid may decrease your risk of wheezing and silence some genes, including those of the immune system. author, Elizabeth Matsui MD

Making a glass jar impacts our environment, you have to burn a gas furnace 24hrs at 2000 degrees, this consumes a  huge amount of energy.

According to the WTC wiping  your feet off before home entry can reduce tracking pesticides by 25%, removing shoes can cut the amount of dust by 10 times, clean carpets every 18months instead of every 12months and save $300

the EPA states the air indoors is 2 to 5times more polluted, install smoke/carbon monoxide detectors, open windows daily, buy air cleaning plants, English ivy, Philodendron, spider; green cleaning recipes at Planetgreen.discovery.com

Rachel Carson‘s book Silent Spring, an early voice for our environment in 1962..get it

Buy local … less packaging if you buy local, more fresh tasty choices …support local farmer’s markets and community gardens

Raising Beef accounts for 18% of global warming emissions worldwide

You can reduce your carbon footprint just by switching to vegetarian meals for 1day, save about 860calories &9pounds of carbon,if done for 2weeks, a reduction of carbon by 122pounds and 12,460calories, losing about 3lbs or more.

In the Library ~ Silent Spring, by Rachel Carson ~


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Rachel Carson’s book “Silent Spring“, an early voice for our environment in 1962 

Silent Spring

 See why Carson’s analysis is more relevant now than ever.Buy Silent Spring at Amazon.com     

Rachel Carson, writer, scientist, and ecologist, grew up simply in the rural river town of Springdale, Pennsylvania. Her mother bequeathed to her a life-long love of nature and the living world that Rachel expressed first as a writer and later as a student of marine biology. Carson graduated from Pennsylvania College for Women (now Chatham College) in 1929, studied at the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory, and received her MA in zoology from Johns Hopkins University in 1932.

She was hired by the U.S. Bureau of Fisheries to write radio scripts during the Depression and supplemented her income writing feature articles on natural history for the Baltimore Sun. She began a fifteen-year career in the federal service as a scientist and editor in 1936 and rose to become Editor-in-Chief of all publications for the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

She wrote pamphlets on conservation and natural resources and edited scientific articles, but in her free time turned her government research into lyric prose, first as an article “Undersea” (1937, for the Atlantic Monthly), and then in a book, Under the Sea-wind (1941). In 1952 she published her prize-winning study of the ocean, The Sea Around Us, which was followed by The Edge of the Sea in 1955. These books constituted a biography of the ocean and made Carson famous as a naturalist and science writer for the public. Carson resigned from government service in 1952 to devote herself to her writing.

She wrote several other articles designed to teach people about the wonder and beauty of the living world, including “Help Your Child to Wonder,” (1956) and “Our Ever-Changing Shore” (1957), and planned another book on the ecology of life. Embedded within all of Carson’s writing was the view that human beings were but one part of nature distinguished primarily by their power to alter it, in some cases irreversibly.

Disturbed by the profligate use of synthetic chemical pesticides after World War II, Carson reluctantly changed her focus in order to warn the public about the long term effects of misusing pesticides. In Silent Spring (1962) she challenged the practices of agricultural scientists and the government, and called for a change in the way humankind viewed the natural world.

Carson was attacked by the chemical industry and some in government as an alarmist, but courageously spoke out to remind us that we are a vulnerable part of the natural world subject to the same damage as the rest of the ecosystem. Testifying before Congress in 1963, Carson called for new policies to protect human health and the environment. Rachel Carson died in 1964 after a long battle against breast cancer. Her witness for the beauty and integrity of life continues to inspire new generations to protect the living world and all its creatures.