History~ the month of March


 

The History Place - This Month in History

March 1, 1781 – Formal ratification of the Articles of Confederation was announced by Congress. Under the Articles, Congress was the sole governing body of the new American national government, consisting of the 13 original states. The Articles remained in effect through the Revolutionary War until 1789, when the current U.S. Constitution was adopted.

March 1, 1932 – The 20-month-old son of aviation pioneer Charles A. Lindbergh was kidnapped from his home in Hopewell, New Jersey. The Lindberghs then paid a $50,000 ransom. However, on May 12, the boy’s body was found in a wooded area a few miles from the house.

March 1, 1961 – President John F. Kennedy established the Peace Corps, an organization sending young American volunteers to developing countries to assist with health care, education and other basic human needs.

March 1, 1974 – Seven former high-ranking officials of the Nixon White House were indicted for conspiring to obstruct the investigation into the Watergate break-in. Among those indicted; former chief of staff H.R. Haldeman, former top aide John Ehrlichman, and former attorney general John Mitchell.

Birthday – American band leader Glenn Miller (1904-1944) was born in Carilinda, Iowa. His music gained enormous popularity during the 1940’s through recordings such as Moonlight Serenade and String of Pearls. On December 15, 1944, his plane disappeared over the English Channel while en route to Paris where he was scheduled to perform.

March 2

March 2, 1943 – During World War II in the Pacific, a Japanese convoy was attacked by 137 American bombers as the Battle of Bismarck Sea began. The convoy included eight destroyers and eight transports carrying 7,000 Japanese soldiers heading toward New Guinea. Four destroyers and all eight transports were sunk, resulting in 3,500 Japanese drowned, ending Japanese efforts to send reinforcements to New Guinea.

Birthday – American soldier and politician Sam Houston (1793-1863) was born in Rockbridge County, Virginia. As a teenager he ran away and joined the Cherokee Indians who accepted him as a member of their tribe. He later served as a Congressman and Governor of Tennessee. In 1832, he became commander of the Texan army in the War for Texan Independence, defeating the larger Mexican army in 1836 at the Battle of San Jacinto. He then served as Senator and Governor of the new state of Texas but was removed in 1861 after refusing to swear allegiance to the Confederacy.

March 3

Rodney King victim of Los Angeles Police Department brutality, after a videotape was released of several police officers beating him during his arrest on March 3, 1991.

March 3, 1913 – A women’s suffrage march in Washington D.C. was attacked by angry onlookers while police stood by. The march occurred the day before Woodrow Wilson’s inauguration. Many of the 5,000 women participating were spat upon and struck in the face as a near riot ensued. Secretary of War Henry Stimson then ordered soldiers from Fort Myer to restore order.

Birthday – Railroad car builder George Pullman (1831-1897) was born in Brocton, New York. He improved railroad sleeping accommodations, developing the folding upper berth and lower berth designs. His company went on to become the biggest railroad car building organization in the world.

Birthday – Telephone inventor Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922) was born in Edinburgh, Scotland. Bell and his father were involved in teaching deaf persons to speak. Bell developed an interest in the vibrating membrane as a method of electrically transmitting sounds. His very first sentence spoken on the newly invented telephone on March 10, 1876, was to his assistant, “Mister Watson, come here, I want you.”

March 4

1778 – The Continental Congress voted to ratify the Treaty of Amity and Commerce and the Treaty of Alliance. The two treaties were the first entered into by the U.S. government.

1791 – Vermont was admitted as the 14th U.S. state. It was the first addition to the original 13 American colonies.

1794 – The 11th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was passed by the U.S. Congress. The Amendment limited the jurisdiction of the federal courts to automatically hear cases brought against a state by the citizens of another state. Later interpretations expanded this to include citizens of the state being sued, as well.

March 4, 1681 – King Charles II of England granted a huge tract of land in the New World to William Penn to settle an outstanding debt. The area later became Pennsylvania.

March 4, 1789 – The first meeting of the new Congress under the new U.S. Constitution took place in New York City.

March 4, 1830 – Former President John Quincy Adams returned to Congress as a representative from Massachusetts. He was the first ex-president ever to return to the House and served eight consecutive terms.

March 4, 1933 – Newly elected President Franklin D. Roosevelt took office and delivered his first inaugural address attempting to restore public confidence during the Great Depression, stating, “Let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself…” His cabinet appointments included the first woman to a Cabinet post, Secretary of Labor, Frances Perkins.

1914 – Doctor Fillatre successfully separated Siamese twins.

1917 – Jeanette Rankin of Montana took her seat as the first woman elected to the House of Representatives.

1947 – France and Britain signed an alliance treaty

1998 – Microsoft repaired software that apparently allowed hackers to shut down computers in government and university offices nationwide.
1998 – The U.S. Supreme Court said that federal law banned on-the-job sexual harassment even when both parties are the same sex.

 

March 5 Return to Top of Page

March 5, 1770 – The Boston Massacre occurred as a group of rowdy Americans harassed British soldiers who then opened fire, killing five and injuring six. The first man killed was Crispus Attucks, an African American. British Captain Thomas Preston and eight of his men were arrested and charged with murder. Their trial took place in October, with colonial lawyer John Adams defending the British. Captain Preston and six of his men were acquitted. Two others were found guilty of manslaughter, branded, then released.

March 5, 1868 – The U.S. Senate convened as a court to hear charges against President Andrew Johnson during impeachment proceedings. The House of Representatives had already voted to impeach the President. The vote followed bitter opposition by the Radical Republicans in Congress to Johnson’s reconstruction policies in the South. However, the effort to remove him failed in the Senate by just one vote and he remained in office.

March 5, 1933 – Amid a steadily worsening economic situation, newly elected President Franklin D. Roosevelt proclaimed a four-day “Bank Holiday” to stop panic withdrawals by the public and the possible collapse of the American banking system.

March 5, 1946 – The “Iron Curtain” speech was delivered by Winston Churchill at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri. Churchill used the term to describe the boundary in Europe between free countries of the West and nations of Eastern Europe under Soviet Russia’s control.

March 6

March 6, 1836 – Fort Alamo fell to Mexican troops led by General Santa Anna. The Mexicans had begun the siege of the Texas fort on February 23rd, ending it with the killing of the last defender. “Remember the Alamo” became a rallying cry for Texans who went on to defeat Santa Anna in the Battle of San Jacinto in April.

Birthday – Renaissance genius Michelangelo (1475-1564) was born in Caprese, Italy. He was a painter, sculptor, architect, poet and visionary best known for his fresco on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel and his sculptures David and The Pieta.

March 7

Birthday – Stephen Hopkins (1707-1785) was born in Providence, Rhode Island. He was the state’s colonial governor and was a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

March 8

March 8, 1863 – During the American Civil War, Confederate Colonel John Mosby, leader of Mosby’s Rangers, captured Union General E.H. Stoughton at his headquarters in Fairfax County Courthouse, Virginia.

March 9

March 9, 1864 – Ulysses S. Grant was commissioned as a Lieutenant General and became commander of the Union armies.

Birthday – Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci (1451-1512) was born in Florence, Italy. He explored South America and the Amazon River, believing he had discovered a new continent. In 1507, a German mapmaker first referred to the lands discovered in the New World as America.

Birthday – Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin (1934-1968) was born in Gzhatsk, Russia. On April 12, 1961, he became the first human in space, orbiting in a capsule 187 miles above the Earth’s surface in a flight lasting 108 minutes. His space flight caused a worldwide sensation and marked the beginning of the space race as the U.S. worked to catch up to the Russians and launch an American into space. President John F. Kennedy later asserted the U.S. would land a man on the moon before the end of the 1960’s.

March 10 Return to Top of Page

March 10, 1862 – The first issue of U.S. government paper money occurred as $5, $10 and $20 bills began circulation.

March 10, 1880 – The Salvation Army was founded in the United States. The social service organization was first founded in England by William Booth and operates today in 90 countries.

Birthday – Politician and playwright Claire Boothe Luce (1903-1987) was born in New York City. She served in the House of Representatives from 1943 to 1947 and then became the first woman appointed as U.S. ambassador to a major country (Italy).

March 11

March 11, 1918 – The ‘Spanish’ influenza first reached America as 107 soldiers become sick at Fort Riley, Kansas. One quarter of the U.S. population eventually became ill from the deadly virus, resulting in 500,000 deaths. The death toll worldwide approached 22 million by the end of 1920.

March 11, 1941 – During World War II, the Lend-Lease program began allowing Britain to receive American weapons, machines, raw materials, training and repair services. Ships, planes, guns and shells, along with food, clothing and metals went to the embattled British while American warships began patrolling the North Atlantic and U.S troops were stationed in Greenland and Iceland. “We must be the great arsenal of democracy,” President Roosevelt declared concerning the fight against Hitler’s Germany. The initial appropriation was $7 Billion, but by 1946 the figure reached $50 Billion in aid from the U.S. to its Allies.

Birthday – British prime minster and statesman Harold Wilson (1916-1995) was born in Huddersfield, Yorkshire. As a young boy he once posed for a photo in front of 10 Downing Street, the residence he occupied 40 years later as head of the Labour government.

March 12

March 12, 1609 – The island of Bermuda was colonized by the British after a ship on its way to Virginia was wrecked on the reefs.

March 12, 1888 – The Great Blizzard of ’88 struck the northeastern U.S. The storm lasted 36 hours with snowfall totaling over 40 inches in New York City where over 400 persons died from the surprise storm.

March 12, 1938 – Nazis invaded Austria, then absorbed the country into Hitler’s Reich.

March 12, 1994 – The Church of England ordained 32 women as its first female priests. In protest, 700 male clergy members and thousands of church members left the church and joined the Roman Catholic Church which does not allow women priests.

March 12, 1999 – Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic became full-fledged members of NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) less than ten years after exchanging communist rule for democracy and ending their Cold War military alliances with Soviet Russia.

Birthday – The founder of modern Turkey, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk (1881-1938) was born in Salonika, Greece. Following World War I, he led the Turkish revolution and became Turkey’s first president.

March 13

1861 Jefferson Davis signs a bill authorizing slaves to be used as soldiers for the Confederacy.

March 13, 1943 – A plot to kill Hitler by German army officers failed as a bomb planted aboard his plane failed to explode due to a faulty detonator.

1991 Exxon pays $1 billion in fines and costs for the clean-up of the Alaskan oil spill.

Birthday – Scientist and clergyman Joseph Priestly (1733-1804) was born in Yorkshire, England. He discovered oxygen and advanced the religious theory of Unitarianism.

 

March 14

Birthday – Albert Einstein (1879-1955) was born in Ulm, Germany. His theory of relativity led to new ways of thinking about time, space, matter and energy. He received a Nobel Prize in 1921 and emigrated to the U.S. in 1933 where he was an outspoken critic of Nazi Germany. Believing the Nazis might develop an atomic bomb, he warned President Roosevelt and urged the development of the U.S. Atomic bomb.

Birthday – The first female dentist, Lucy Hobbs (1833-1910) was born in New York state. She received her degree in 1866 from the Ohio College of Dental Surgery and was a women’s rights advocate.

March 15 Return to Top of Page

March 15, 44 B.C. – Julius Caesar was assassinated in the Senate chamber in Rome by Brutus and fellow conspirators. After first trying to defend himself against the murderous onslaught, Caesar saw Brutus with a knife and asked “Et tu, Brute?” (You too, Brutus?) Caesar then gave up the struggle and was stabbed to death.

Birthday – Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) the 7th U.S. President was born in a log cabin in Waxhaw, South Carolina. As a boy he volunteered to serve in the American Revolution. Captured by the British, he refused an order to clean an officer’s boots and was slashed by his sword. Jackson later gained fame as a hero during the War of 1812. In politics he helped form the new Democratic Party and became the first man from an impoverished background to be elected President, serving from 1829 to 1837.

March 16

March 16, 1968 – During the Vietnam War, the My Lai Massacre occurred as American soldiers of Charlie Company murdered 504 Vietnamese men, women, and children. Twenty-five U.S. Army officers were later charged with complicity in the massacre and subsequent cover-up, but only one was convicted, and later pardoned by President Richard Nixon.

March 16, 1968 – New York Senator Robert Kennedy announced his intention to run for the Democratic presidential nomination.

Birthday – James Madison (1751-1836) the 4th U.S. President was born in Port Conway, Virginia. He played an important role in the formation of the new U.S. Constitution following the American Revolutionary War. During the War of 1812, President Madison was forced to flee Washington, D.C,. while the British attacked and burned the White House and other important public buildings.

March 17

March 17th – Celebrated as Saint Patrick’s Day commemorating the patron saint of Ireland.

March 17, 1776 – Early in the American Revolutionary War the British completed their evacuation of Boston following a successful siege conducted by Patriots. The event is still commemorated in Boston as Evacuation Day.

Birthday – U.S. Supreme Court Justice Roger B. Taney (1777-1864) was born in Calvert County, Maryland. He became the 5th Chief Justice in 1836, best known for the Dred Scott decision.

March 18

March 18, 1974 – The five-month-old Arab oil embargo against the U.S. was lifted. The embargo was in retaliation for American support of Israel during the Yom Kipper War of 1973 in which Egypt and Syria suffered a crushing defeat. In the U.S., the resulting embargo had caused long lines at gas stations as prices soared 300 percent amid shortages and a government ban on Sunday gas sales.

Birthday – Grover Cleveland (1837-1908) the 22nd and 24th U.S. president was born in Caldwell, New Jersey. He was the only president to serve two nonconsecutive terms and was also the only president to be married in the White House.

March 19

1918 – The U.S. Congress approved Daylight-Saving Time.

1920 – The U.S. Senate rejected the Versailles Treaty for the second time maintaining an isolation policy.

1984 – A Mobile oil tanker spilled 200,000 gallons into the Columbia River.

2001 – California officials declared a power alert and ordered the first of two days of rolling blackouts.

1917 – The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the Adamson Act that made the eight-hour workday for railroads constitutional.

March 19, 2003 – The United States launched an attack against Iraq to topple dictator Saddam Hussein from power. The attack commenced with aerial strikes against military sites, followed the next day by an invasion of southern Iraq by U.S. and British ground troops. The troops made rapid progress northward and conquered the country’s capital, Baghdad, just 21 days later, ending the rule of Saddam.

Birthday – William Bradford (1589-1657) was born in Yorkshire, England. He sailed aboard the Mayflower during its 66-day voyage from Plymouth, England to Massachusetts in 1620. The small ship carried over 100 passengers and a crew of 30. It was originally bound for Virginia but landed far north on Cape Cod. The Mayflower Compact was then drawn up as a form of government. Bradford became the first governor of the new Plymouth Colony, serving a total of 30 years, and was largely responsible for its success.

Birthday – Explorer and medical missionary David Livingstone (1813-1873) was born in Blantyre, Scotland. He arrived at Cape Town, Africa, in 1841 and began extensive missionary explorations, often traveling into areas that had never seen a white man. In his later years, he sought the source of the Nile River. He also became the subject of the famous search by news correspondent Henry Stanley who located him in 1871 near Lake Tanganyika in Africa after a difficult search and simply asked, “Dr. Livingstone, I presume?”

Birthday – Wyatt Earp (1848-1929) was born in Monmouth, Illinois. He became a legendary figure in the Wild West as a lawman and gunfighter, best known for the shootout at the O.K. Corral in 1881, in which the Earp brothers (Wyatt, Virgil and Morgan) fought and defeated the Ike Clanton gang.

 

March 20 Return to Top of Page

March 20, 1995 – A nerve gas attack occurred on the Tokyo subway system during rush hour resulting in 12 persons killed and 5,000 injured. Japanese authorities later arrest the leader and members of a Japanese religious cult suspected in the attack.

Birthday – American psychologist B.F. Skinner (1904-1990) was born in Susquehanna, Pennsylvania. He pioneered theories of behaviorism and developed the Skinner box, a controlled environment for studying behavior.

March 21

March 21, 1918 – During World War I, the Second Battle of the Somme began as German General Erich von Ludendorff launched an all-out drive to win the war. The battle began with a five-hour artillery barrage followed by a rush of German troops. The offensive lasted until April 6th and resulted in the Germans gaining about 35 miles of territory. Allied and German casualty figures for both battles approached 500,000.

March 21, 1943 – A suicide/assassination plot by German Army officers against Hitler failed as the conspirators were unable to locate a short fuse for the bomb which was to be carried in the coat pocket of General von Gersdorff to ceremonies Hitler was attending.

Birthday – Organist and composer Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) was born in Eissenach, Germany. His output included thousands of compositions, many used in churches. Among his best known works; The Brandenburg Concertos for orchestra, The Well-Tempered Clavier for keyboard, the St. John and St. Matthew passions, and the Mass in B Minor.

March 22

March 22, 1972 – The Equal Rights Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was passed by the U.S. Senate and then sent to the states for ratification. The ERA, as it became known, prohibited discrimination on the basis of gender, stating, “Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex,” and that “the Congress shall have the power to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article.” Although 22 of the required 38 states quickly ratified the Amendment, opposition arose over concerns that women would be subject to the draft and combat duty, along with other legal concerns. The ERA eventually failed (by 3 states) to achieve ratification despite an extension of the deadline to June 1982.

March 23

1942 – During World War II, the U.S. government began evacuating Japanese-Americans from West Coast homes to detention centers.

1990 – Former Exxon Valdez Captain Joseph Hazelwood was ordered to help clean up Prince William Sound and pay $50,000 in restitution for the 1989 oil spill.

1919 – Benito Mussolini founded his Fascist political movement in Milan, Italy.

1932 – In the U.S., the Norris-LaGuardia Act established workers’ right to strike.

1806 – Explorers Lewis and Clark, reached the Pacific coast, and began their return journey to the east.

1840 – The first successful photo of the Moon was taken.

1981 – U.S. Supreme Court upheld a law making statutory rape a crime for men but not women

March 23, 1775 – Patrick Henry ignited the American Revolution with a speech before the Virginia convention in Richmond, stating, “I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death!”

1902 – In Italy, the minimum legal working age was raised from 9 to 12 for boys and from 11 to 15 for girls

1889 – U.S. President Harrison opened Oklahoma for white colonization. 

1998 – Germany’s largest bank pledged $3.1 million to Jewish foundations as restitution for Nazi looting.

1998 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that term limits for state lawmakers were constitutional

1901 – It was learned that Boers were starving in British concentration camps in South Africa.

March 24

March 24, 1934 – The Philippine Islands in the South Pacific were granted independence by President Franklin D. Roosevelt after nearly 50 years of American control.

March 24, 1989 – One of the largest oil spills in U.S. history occurred as the oil tanker Exxon Valdez ran aground in Prince William Sound off Alaska, resulting in 11 million gallons of oil leaking into the natural habitat over a stretch of 45 miles.

Birthday – Harry Houdini (1874-1926) was born (as Erik Weisz) in Budapest, Hungary. He came to the U.S. with his family as an infant and lived in New York City. He began as a Coney Island magician, then became a world famous escape artist, known for escaping from chains, handcuffs, straightjackets, locked boxes and milk cans filled with water. He died on Halloween 1926 from a burst appendix and was buried in Queens, NY.

March 25

1965 – Martin Luther King Jr. led a group of 25,000 to the state capital in Montgomery, AL.

1947 – John L. Lewis called a strike in sympathy for the miners killed in an explosion in Centralia, IL, on March 25, 1947

March 25, 1807 – The British Parliament abolished the slave trade following a long campaign against it by Quakers and others.

March 25, 1911 – A raging fire erupted inside a garment factory in New York City killing 123 young women employed as low-paid seamstresses, along with 23 men. The fast-spreading flames engulfed the 8th and 9th floors of the Triangle Shirtwaist Company in lower Manhattan in just a few minutes. About 50 of the victims had jumped to their deaths rather than perish from the flames. The sensational tragedy spurred national interest concerning the rights of mostly-immigrant women workers of the New York garment industry who labored long hours six or seven days a week in cramped, dangerous conditions for about $5 weekly pay.

March 26

March 26, 1979 – The Camp David Accord ended 30 years of warfare between Israel and Egypt. Prime Minster Menachem Begin of Israel and Egyptian President Anwar Sadat signed the treaty of mutual recognition and peace, fostered by U.S. President Jimmy Carter.

March 26, 1992 – Soviet Cosmonaut Serge Krikalev returned to a new country (Russia) after spending 313 days on board the Mir Space Station. During his stay in space, the Soviet Union (USSR) collapsed and became the Commonwealth of Independent States.

Birthday – American playwright Tennessee Williams (1911-1983) was born in Columbus, Mississippi. His works featured Southern settings and include; The Glass MenagerieNight of the Iguana, and two Pulitzer Prize winning plays, A Streetcar Named Desire and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof .

March 27

March 27, 1977 – The worst accident in the history of civil aviation occurred as two Boeing 747 jets collided on the ground in the Canary Islands, resulting in 570 deaths.

March 28

March 28, 1979 – Near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident occurred in which uranium in the reactor core overheated due to the failure of a cooling valve. A pressure relief valve then stuck causing the water level to plummet, threatening a catastrophic nuclear meltdown. The accident resulted in the release of radioactive steam into the atmosphere, and created a storm of controversy over the necessity and safety of nuclear power plants.

March 29

March 29, 1979 – In the U.S. Congress, the House Select Committee on Assassinations released its final report regarding the killings of John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, and Robert Kennedy.

Birthday – John Tyler (1790-1862) the 10th U.S. President was born in Charles City County, Virginia. He became president upon the death of William H. Harrison and served from 1841 to 1845. In 1861, Tyler was elected to the Confederate Congress, but died before being seated.

March 30

1855 – About 5,000 “Border Ruffians” from western Missouri invaded the territory of Kansas and forced the election of a pro-slavery legislature. It was the first election in Kansas.

1958 – The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater gave its initial performance.

March 30, 1981 – Newly elected President Ronald Reagan was shot in the chest while walking toward his limousine in Washington, D.C., following a speech inside a hotel. The president was then rushed into surgery to remove a 22-caliber bullet from his left lung. “I should have ducked,” Reagan joked. Three others were also hit including Reagan’s Press Secretary, James Brady, who was shot in the forehead but survived. The president soon recovered from the surgery and returned to his duties.

1909 – In Oklahoma, Seminole Indians revolted against meager pay for government jobs.

1981 – U.S. President Ronald Reagan was shot and wounded in Washington, DC, by John W. Hinckley Jr. Two police officers and Press Secretary James Brady were also wounded.

Birthday – Vincent Van Gogh (1853-1890) was born in Groot Zundert, Holland. He was a Postimpressionist painter, generally considered the greatest Dutch painter after Rembrandt. During his short (10-year) painting career he produced over 800 oil paintings and 700 drawings, but sold only one during his lifetime. In 1987, the sale of his painting Irises brought $53.9 million, the highest price ever paid for a work of art up to that time. During his life, Van Gogh suffered from despair and bouts of mental illness, at one point cutting off part of his own left ear. He committed suicide in 1890 by gunshot.

March 31

1945 – “The Glass Menagerie” by Tennessee Williams opened on Broadway.

1776 – Abigail Adams wrote to her husband John that women were “determined to foment a rebellion” if the new Declaration of Independence failed to guarantee their rights.

March 31, 1933 – The Civilian Conservation Corps, the CCC, was founded. Unemployed men and youths were organized into quasi-military formations and worked outdoors in national parks and forests.

March 31, 1968 – President Lyndon Johnson made a surprise announcement that he would not seek re-election as a result of the Vietnam conflict.

1885 – Binney & Smith Company was founded in New York City. The company later became Crayola, LLC.

1889 – In Paris, the Eiffel Tower officially opened.

1870 – In Perth Amboy, NJ, Thomas Munday Peterson became the first black to vote in the U.S.

1902 – In Tennessee, 22 coal miners were killed by an explosion.

1904 – In India, hundreds of Tibetans were slaughtered by the British.

1908 – 250,000 coal miners in Indianapolis, IN, went on strike to await a wage adjustment.

1900 – In France, the National Assembly passed a law reducing the workday for women and children to 11 hours.

March 31, 1991 – The Soviet Republic of Georgia, birthplace of Josef Stalin, voted to declare its independence from Soviet Russia, after similar votes by Lithuania, Estonia and Latvia. Following the vote in Georgia, Russian troops were dispatched from Moscow under a state of emergency.

Birthday – Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809) was born in Rohrau, Austria. Considered the father of the symphony and the string quartet, his works include 107 symphonies, 50 divertimenti, 84 string quartets, 58 piano sonatas, and 13 masses. Based in Vienna, Mozart was his friend and Beethoven was a pupil.

Birthday – Boxing champion Jack Johnson (1878-1946) was born in Galveston, Texas. He was the first African American to win the heavyweight boxing title.

(Photo and picture credits: Library of Congress and U.S. National Archives)

The NRA’s #1 priority ~ indivisible.org


It’s been over two weeks since the students of Stoneman Douglas High School lives’ changed because of a horrific mass shooting. And after losing 17 classmates and teachers, they sprung into action to advocate to stop gun violence in Congress’ absence. And they’re not. slowing. down.

Within days, youth organized events across the country. Between Women’s March Youth EMPOWER on March 14March for Our Lives in Washington DC on March 24, and National School Walkout on April 20 (look at all the walkouts they’ve registered!!), something is definitely different about this moment.

This week alone, the Illinois legislature (with the help of their local Indivisible groups!) approved a bill to raise the minimum age to buy assault-style weapons to 21. Two of the country’s leading gun retailers, Dick’s Sporting Goods and Walmart, publicly announced that they’ll raise their minimum age for firearm purchase to 21, and they will no longer sell assault-style weapons.

Everywhere, people are waking up to the rallying cry for change because of the bold action young people, and their families, are taking. Policies must change and this moment won’t just pass by like others have. Too many lives have been lost, we cannot afford to let inaction go on any longer.

In order to keep this momentum going, we need you to keep pressure on your members of Congress (MoCs). Here’s what you need to know:

  • Congress is considering making mass shootings easier, instead of working to prevent them. Tell your MoCs: don’t pass the Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act.

  • This is the top priority of the NRA and would require states to recognize the gun laws of other states. That means that gun owners from states with minimal restrictions would be able to legally carry their weapons a-n-y-w-h-e-r-e.
  • This bill has already passed the House and the Senate is expected to bring it up this year. Read our resource on the Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act and contact your Senators before this bill comes up for a vote.

This week on Capitol Hill

  • A bipartisan group of senators is trying to stop Trump’s war in Yemen. Senators Mike Lee and Bernie Sanders introduced S.J.Res. 54 using a procedure under the War Powers Resolution to force a vote on the Senate floor to declare US participation in the Yemen war unauthorized. The vote will happen in the next few days, so call your senators today and demand they support S.J.Res. 54.
  • This Monday is the “DACA Cliff” when more Dreamers will lose protections. Even though a court ordered the government to continue accepting DACA renewals, the number of recipients losing protections will dramatically increase on Monday. We support the efforts of Dreamer-led organizations like United We Dream demanding relief for Dreamers, who will hold events in DC and around the country. The next opportunity for Congress to provide relief for Dreamers will be on March 23 when they need to fund the government (yet again). See our resource on how you can be an immigrant ally.
  • Republicans and Democrats are teaming up… to deregulate Wall Street. (Seriously.) In a follow-up to the #GOPTaxScam, the Senate is trying to deregulate Wall Street in the form of S. 2155. This “Bank Lobbyist Act” will make it easier for discrimination in home lending to go unnoticed, end key consumer protections for homebuyers, and put us at risk of another financial crisis. You can use our resource and call script to call your Senator and tell them to vote no on S. 2155.

This week’s Trump Threat Level

  • Jared Kushner’s business interests are a national security risk. Bob Mueller’s team has been asking witnesses for details regarding Kushner’s discussions with foreign country’s financing for his business. This comes after revelations that several nations have discussed how they can use Kushner’s business interests to manipulate him.
  • A key U.S. diplomat overseeing North Korea policy has retired.Joseph Yun, the U.S. Special Representative for North Korea Policy, announced he would be retiring effective March 2. His departure is the latest in a staggering exodus of personnel from the State Department since Trump took office that has drained our nation’s diplomatic capacity, even as Trump creates new crises seemingly every week.
  • Trump wants to sell nuclear reactors to Saudi Arabia, even though the kingdom will not accept critical restrictions intended to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons.

Visit trumpthreatlevel.indivisible.org for a running list of all the ways Trump makes us less safe and our latest foreign policy resources.


248 days until the blue wave hits

This Tuesday, the midterm elections kick off as Texas holds it’s first-in-the-nation primary. We’re ready to get to work on elections, and we know you are too. Here’s what you can do to get started (unless you’re in Texas, you should vote on Tuesday!):

→ Visit our one-stop-shop (well, website) for your elections needs at indivisible435.org. We have resources to help you demystify elections, learn more about voting rights and voter suppression, and much, much more.

→ Make sure you’re registered to vote! This is so, so, so important. We’ve set up a tool on our website to make it super easy to get registered. Once you’re done registering, make sure all your family and friends are registered, too!

→ Find your local Indivisible Group now. Building power starts on your home turf. Get connected to your local Indivisible leaders to get engaged and get ready to take back Congress on November 6!

In 2017, we changed politics. In 2018, we can change elections. Let’s get to work!

In solidarity,
The Indivisible Team

Seattle Salmon Cannon Going Global


Washington SBDC representatives

Left to Right: Vince Bryan III, CEO of Whooshh; Sharon Sappington, SBDC export advisor; Brian Kraft, WSU assistant vice president for Innovation and Research Engagement; and Duane Fladland, state director of the Washington SBDC

Whooshh Innovations, creator of the so-called Salmon Cannon, was highlighted at the America’s Small Business Development Center’s Client Showcase on Capitol Hill last week.

Whooshh is a Seattle-based company headed by CEO Vince Bryan III that developed an innovative system that transports fish around barriers – including major hydropower dams – safely, efficiently and at less cost than traditional fish ladders.

According to Bryan, the Whooshh fish transport system is better for the health of fish populations than traditional fish ladders, but U.S. regulations intended to protect U.S. waterways make it difficult for new technology to gain approval. Bryan indicated that Europe has a faster approval process.

In early 2017 Whooshh executives began meeting with Sharon Sappington, the Washington Small Business Development Center (SBDC) export adviser based in Everett, for assistance on developing export and domestic strategies.

When Sappington learned of the challenges Whooshh was facing in the United States, she initiated a significant research project with the Washington SBDC Market Intelligence Research program to identify potential markets.

Thanks to the assistance from Washington SBDC, Whooshh continues to explore and develop new market opportunities for the Salmon Cannon both domestically and internationally.

“It’s extremely difficult for an entrepreneur to reach commercial viability with disruptive technology such as Whooshh fish transport because there is no existing market for the product,” Bryan said. “That’s why the no-cost services of the SBDC are so crucial.”

SBA Seattle District Office

updates.sba.gov

So, What do you think about this? does it hurt or help tribal land or encroach upon it and the health of our water ways ? -Nativegrl77