Tenure of Office Act


Definition of Tenure of Office Act The Impeachment Trial of Andrew Johnson

Definition: The Tenure of Office Act was passed by Congress on March 2, 1867. President Andrew Johnson attempted to veto the law, but failed. The reason that Congress passed the Tenure of Office Act was to limit the President’s powers and prevent President Andrew Johnson dismissing radical Republicans from office. The President subsequently ignored the Tenure of Office Act and suspended Edwin Stanton, the Secretary of War and a prominent cabinet member. This action led to the Impeachment of Andrew Johnson.

Events leading to the Tenure of Office Act
The events leading up to the Tenure of Office Act were due to the conflict between President Andrew Johnson and the radical Republicans in Congress over the Reconstruction of the South. In April 1865, Vice President Andrew Johnson, a Southern Democrat, assumed the Presidency following the assassination of President Lincoln. Johnson adopts the Reconstruction plans of Lincoln but on December 1, 1865 President Johnson abruptly declared the end to Reconstruction. Congress was outraged, and Radical Republicans refuse to recognize the new governments in southern states who were attempting to restore self-rule. The Southern states had passed the notorious Black Codes during 1865 -1866 and were reluctant to ratify the 13th Amendment. President Johnson further infuriated Congress by vetoing an extension to the Freedmen’s Bureau and the Republicans responded by passing the Civil Rights Act of 1866 overriding the President’s veto. The Congressional elections of November, 1866, were greatly in favor of the radical Republicans and in support of their policy for reconstruction. Congress passed the first of the Reconstruction Acts which gave them military control of the South.

When was the Tenure of Office Act passed?
Congress passed the Tenure of Office Act on March 2, 1867.

Why did Congress pass the Tenure of Office Act?
Congress passed the Tenure of Office Act to limit the President’s powers and prevent President Andrew Johnson dismissing radical Republicans from office. They hoped that the Tenure of Office Act would to assure the continuance in office of Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton and therefore prevent any interference with the military occupation of the South in the Congressional Reconstruction plan. Edwin Stanton was a valuable member of the existing cabinet and a firm supporter of the Radical Republican’s Reconstruction policies and was openly opposed to President Johnson.

What were the provisions of the Tenure of Office Act?
The provisions of the Tenure of Office Act were that:
● It forbade the President to remove any federal officeholder appointed by and with the advice and consent of the Senate without the further approval of the Senate
● It also provided that members of the President’s cabinet should hold office for the full term of the President who appointed them and one month thereafter, subject to removal by the Senate

Tenure of Office Act for kids: The Reaction of President Johnson
President Johnson tried and failed to veto the Tenure of Office Act. Ever since the formation of the United States government the Presidents had removed officers when they saw fit. The Tenure of Office Act required the consent of the Senate to removals as well as to appointments. Johnson believed that the Tenure of Office Act was unconstitutional.

Tenure of Office Act for kids: Edwin Stanton
In December 1867 President Johnson ignored the Tenure of Office Act and suspended Edwin Stanton from office. Stanton refused to budge and barricaded himself in his office claiming that the Tenure of Office Act protected him. The House of Representatives invoked the new Tenure of Office Act to initiate Impeachment proceedings against President Johnson. In the history of the United States there have only been two Impeached Presidents – both were acquitted.

Tenure of Office Act for kids: The Aftermath
The Tenure of Office Act was partly repealed partly in 1869 and entirely cancelled in 1887. In 1926 the Tenure of Office Act was declared by the U.S. Supreme Court to have been unconstitutional

Tenure of Office Act – President Andrew Johnson Video
The article on the Tenure of Office Act provides an overview of one of the Important issues of his presidential term in office. The following Andrew Johnson video will give you additional important facts and dates about the political events experienced by the 17th American President whose presidency spanned from April 15, 1865 to March 4, 1869.

 

This website is produced by the Siteseen network that specializes in producing free informative websites on a diverse range of topics.

Tell the “Failed Trade Commission”: Stop deceptive advertising for the Equifax settlement


Petition to the Federal Trade Commission and its Office of Inspector General:  

We demand the Federal Trade Commission and its Office of Inspector General launch an immediate investigation into the Federal Trade Commission’s false and deceptive advertising surrounding its settlement with Equifax. The FTC has authority under Section 5 of the FTC Act to police unfair and deceptive practices such as this. In addition to a full investigation, we demand the FTC issue an immediate cease and desist to itself and prohibit itself from making future deceptive statements.

Emails under your name will be sent to Commissioners of the Federal Trade Commission when you sign this petition.

You know that $125 you’re supposed to get from Equifax for its data breach? Yeah, that’s not happening.1

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Equifax let us think we were going to get a cash payout, when instead they intended claimants to sign up for credit monitoring services.2

The government is supposed to protect us from scams and deceptive advertising–but under the Trump administration they’re in on the con.

Tell the FTC to investigate itself for false and deceptive advertising–and fine itself enough to ensure everyone gets the full $125 who signed up for it.

In 2017, Equifax announced a data breach that let criminals have access to the personal information of 147 million people–including names, social security numbers, and addresses.

Equifax and the Federal Trade Commission reached a settlement for Equifax’s gross negligence that they said included either free credit monitoring for 10 years or a $125 payout to claimants.

Last month, the FTC said Equifax would pay at least $575 million (possibly up to $700 million) because of its gross negligence and lack of security measures that led to the breach of customer data.3

But on Wednesday, the FTC announced that there were so many claimants that people wouldn’t receive anything near $125 and urged them to sign up for credit monitoring instead.4

FTC staffer Robert Schoshinski wrote that the “the pot of money that pays for” cash refunds for hardship “is $31 million.”5 As one commenter on the FTC blog said, did the FTC forget to do the math? The data breach affected 147 million people. There is no reasonable explanation for advertising a cash payout of $125 with those numbers.6

Tell the FTC to stop their false and deceptive advertising and ensure everyone gets what they signed up to receive.

Sources:
1. Federal Trade Commission, “Equifax Data Breach Settlement FAQ,” July 31st, 2019.
2. Federal Trade Commission Consumer Information Blog, “Equifax data breach: Pick free credit monitoring,” July 31st, 2019.
3. Federal Trade Commission, “Equifax to Pay $575 Million as Part of Settlement with FTC, CFPB, and States Related to 2017 Data Breach,” July 22nd, 2019.
4. Federal Trade Commission Consumer Information Blog, “Equifax data breach: Pick free credit monitoring,” July 31st, 2019.
5. Ibid.
6. The Washington Post, “‘Did someone forget to do the math?’ Consumers, advocates rail against lowered Equifax cash payouts,” August 1st, 2019.

Click here to sign

Unionize …Writers,Gamers,Developers, ~Labor workers deserve better ->Video Gaming Industry!


If you are part of this crunch bs … UNIONIZE!  ~ Nativegrl77

On the latest episode of Patriot Act, Hasan takes a look at how the video game industry has grown into a $139 billion a year business and a cultural force. While gaming is more prominent than ever, some of the most popular video games are made under unfavorable working conditions. Hasan examines the exploitative labor practices at game developers like Epic and Riot Games, and the ways in which workers are finally fighting back.

Watch Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj on Netflix:
https://www.netflix.com/title/80239931

#Netflix #PatriotAct #HasanMinhaj
Subscribe: https://bit.ly/2OHQXpO

About Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj:
New episodes, new topics, every Sunday – only on Netflix. Hasan Minhaj brings an incisive and nuanced perspective to global news, politics, and culture in his unique comedy series. Subscribe to the Patriot Act channel now to stay up to date with episode clips and original content from Hasan and the Patriot Act team.

About Netflix:
Netflix is the world’s leading internet entertainment service with over 148 million paid memberships in over 190 countries enjoying TV series, documentaries and feature films across a wide variety of genres and languages. Members can watch as much as they want, anytime, anywhere, on any internet-connected screen. Members can play, pause and resume watching, all without commercials or commitments.