Happy Dad’s Day – on june 19,1910 …a history by the Art of Manliness


Father’s Day is coming up, so in honor of dear old dad, the Art of Manliness  is presenting a series of father-themed posts. Today we look into the history of Father’s Day. Sadly, retailers and marketers, in an effort to make a quick buck, have bastardized the original meaning of Father’s Day. A holiday that was supposed to honor dad and enumerate his special qualities, now is used to sell chili pepper ties and shop vacs. Hopefully by understanding why the concept of Father’s Day was created, we can better celebrate and honor the fathers who raised us into men.

The History of Father’s Day in the United States

There are two stories of when the first Father’s Day was celebrated.

According to some accounts, the first Father’s Day was celebrated in Washington State on June 19, 1910.

A woman by the name of Sonora Smart Dodd came up with the idea of honoring and celebrating her father while listening to a Mother’s Day sermon at church in 1909. She felt as though mothers were getting all the acclaim while fathers were equally deserving of a day of praise (She would probably be displeased that Mother’s Day still gets the lion’s share of attention).

Sonora’s dad was quite a man. William Smart, a veteran of the Civil War, was left a widower when his wife died while giving birth to their sixth child. He went on to raise the six children by himself on their small farm in Washington. To show her appreciation for all the hard work and love William gave to her and her siblings, Sonora thought there should be a day to pay homage to him and other dads like him. She initially suggested June 5th, the anniversary of her father’s death to be the designated day to celebrate Father’s Day, but due to some bad planning, the celebration in Spokane, Washington was deferred to the third Sunday in June.

The other story of the first Father’s Day in America happened all the way on the other side of the country in Fairmont, West Virginia on July 5, 1908. Grace Golden Clayton suggested to the minister of the local Methodist church that they hold services to celebrate fathers after a deadly mine explosion killed 361 men.

While Father’s Day was celebrated locally in several communities across the country, unofficial support to make the celebration a national holiday began almost immediately. William Jennings Bryant was one of its staunchest proponents. In 1924, President Calvin “Silent Cal” Coolidge recommended that Father’s Day become a national holiday. But no official action was taken.

In 1966, Lyndon B. Johnson, through an executive order, designated the third Sunday in June as the official day to celebrate Father’s Day. However, it wasn’t until 1972, during the Nixon administration, that Father’s Day was officially recognized as a national holiday.

Father’s Day Around The World

Other countries also picked up on the idea of Father’s Day. While many followed suit by celebrating it on the third Sunday in June, some decided to honor dad on different dates. So, to make sure you know when to pay your respects to dear old dad wherever you may be, here’s a list of the dates Father’s Day is celebrated across the world.

  • March 14– Iran
  • March 19– Bolivia, Honduras, Italy, Lichtenstein, Portugal, Spain
  • May 8– South Korea
  • First Sunday in June– Lithuania
  • Second Sunday in June– Austria, Ecuador, Belgium
  • Third Sunday in June– Antigua, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Columbia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, France, Greece, Guyana, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, Jamaica, Japan, Malaysia, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Netherlands, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Saint Vincent, Singapore, Slovakia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Switzerland, Trinidad, Turkey, United Kingdom, Venezuela, Zimbabwe
  • June 17– El Salvador, Guatemala
  • June 23– Nicaragua, Poland, Uganda
  • Second Sunday in July– Uruguay
  • Last Sunday in July– Dominican Republic
  • Second Sunday in August– Brazil
  • August 8– Taiwan, China
  • August 24– Argentina
  • First Sunday in September– Australia, New Zealand
  • New Moon of September– Nepal
  • First Sunday in October– Luxembourg
  • Second Sunday in November– Estonia, Finland, Norway, Sweden
  • December 5– Thailand

This Father’s Day, don’t just buy your Pops a crappy “World’s Best Dad” mug. Write him a card expressing some of the things you love and admire about him. Nothing mushy. Just tell him that you’re glad to be his son.

1943 – Race-related rioting erupted in Detroit. Federal troops were sent in two days later to end the violence that left more than 30 dead


Pulling a man off a streetcar, Detroit Riot, 1943

Fair use image

The Detroit Riot of 1943 lasted only about 24 hours from 10:30 on June 20 to 11:00 p.m. on June 21; nonetheless, it was considered one of the worst riots during the World War II era.  Several contributing factors revolved around police brutality, and the sudden influx of black migrants from the south into the city, lured by the promise of jobs in defense plants.  The migrants faced an acute housing shortage which many thought would be reduced by the construction of public housing.  However the construction of public housing for blacks in predominately white neighborhoods often created racial tension.

The Sojourner Truth Homes Riot in 1942, for example, began when whites were enraged by the opening of that project in their neighborhood.  Mobs attempted to keep the black residents from moving into their new homes.  That confrontation laid the foundation for the much larger riot one year later.

On June 20, a warm Saturday evening, a fist fight broke out between a black man and a white man at the sprawling Belle Isle Amusement Park in the Detroit River.  The brawl eventually grew into a confrontation between groups of blacks and whites, and then spilled into the city.  Stores were looted, and buildings were burned in the riot, most of which were located in a black neighborhood.  The riot took place in an area of roughly two miles in and around Paradise Valley, one of the oldest and poorest neighborhoods in Detroit, Michigan.

As the violence escalated, both blacks and whites engaged in violence.  Blacks dragged whites out of cars and looted white-owned stores in Paradise Valley while whites overturned and burned black-owned vehicles and attacked African Americans on streetcars along Woodward Avenue and other major streets.  The Detroit police did little in the rioting, often siding with the white rioters in the violence.

The violence ended only after President Franklin Roosevelt, at the request of Detroit Mayor Edward Jeffries, Jr., ordered 6,000 federal troops into the city.  Twenty-five blacks and nine whites were killed in the violence.  Of the 25 African Americans who died, 17 were killed by the police.  The police claimed that these shootings were justified since the victims were engaged in looting stores on Hastings Street.  Of the nine whites who died, none were killed by the police.  The city suffered an estimated $2 million in property damages.

June Solstice: Longest and Shortest Day of the Year


By Vigdis Hocken and Aparna Kher

The June solstice is the summer solstice in the Northern Hemisphere and the winter solstice in the Southern Hemisphere.

Earth's position in relation to the Sun's rays at the June solstice.
Position of Earth in relation to the Sun during the June solstice (not to scale).© timeanddate.com

Different Dates

The date varies between June 20 and June 22, depending on the year, and the local time zone.

June Solstice in Seattle, Washington, USA is on
Sunday, June 20, 2021 at 8:32 pm PDT (Change city)

June Solstice in Universal Coordinated Time is on
Monday, June 21, 2021 at 03:32 UTC

Zenith Furthest Away from the Equator

A solstice happens when the sun’s zenith is at its furthest point from the equator. On the June solstice, it reaches its northernmost point and the Earth’s North Pole tilts directly towards the sun, at about 23.4 degrees.

It’s also known as the northern solstice because it occurs when the sun is directly over the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere.

Source: timeanddate.com

tea party, birthers and the misinformation re: voting


The struggle continues…

I don’t know about you but these days, the chaos before during and even after the era of trump, I continue to think Election2010 and how the Tea Party shoved our Govt into an express elevator that took us back in time, though we were warned no one seemed to take any of it very seriously.

I have always voted during midterms & national elections via mail so suppression here in Washington is less likely to happen though they did cut eight days from early voting once & voters screamed. Now, that the era of trump though only four years is over, unfortunately, this administration went into what appears to be White is more Right mode and made it possible for discrimination in all it’s forms to function as long as the right people are legislating it carefully and or blatantly enough … Those of us under “Protective Classes” are beginning to lose rights in several states…

The struggle continues and our voices are needed now more than ever.

Now, at least in Washington State they are trying to expand voting options.

#MidtermsMatters and #SpecialElections

Unfortunately, the NEW Jim Crow South ideology will always be tough, but our Youth can and must be part of the change we all need by voting in HUGE numbers, stay inline and mobilize around qualified democrats on the local &national elections.

We need to rise up against suppression … Women, POC, Students, Seniors, Gays and Immigrants and vote so students can finish school without the fear that Republicans love to engage in

~ Nativegrl77

7 Facts About the June Solstice ~


What You Need to Know About the Longest Day of the Year

By The Editors 2019

This year, the June solstice falls on Sunday, June 20.

Enjoy seven cool (or, is it “hot”?) solstice facts—and see how many you know!

If you ask friends what happens on the summer solstice, they’re likely to get it right. It’s the longest day of the year, meaning this day has the most minutes of sunshine. And the midday Sun is highest up in the sky, or lowest if you live in the Southern Hemisphere.

Let’s learn something new about the longest day of the year.
June Solstice Facts!

Let’s get on with some fun facts about the June solstice:

  • On the solstice, the Sun moves through the sky along its most-curved path. It rises and keeps veering to the right as it passes high overhead—quite different from the laser-straight path the Sun moves along in late March and late September.
  • The solstice Sun stands directly over the Tropic of Cancer. In fact, that’s how the Tropic of Cancer got its name. It’s the northernmost line connecting all places on Earth where the Sun is ever straight up. That’s because a few thousand years ago, the solstice happened when the Sun was in the constellation of Cancer the Crab.
  • The June solstice is when folks in the Northern Hemisphere see the highest Sun of the year. But did you know that the Sun’s highest point is getting lower and lower over time? That’s because Earth’s tilt is slowly decreasing.
  • For those at the equator, the solstice is when the Sun is lowest in the sky.
  • The word “solstice” comes from the Latin words sol “Sun” and stitium “standing.” On the summer solstice, the Sun’s path stops advancing northward each day and “stands” still.
  • In India, the summer solstice ends the six-month period when spiritual growth is supposedly easiest. Better hurry, you only have a few days left!
  • On this day, the Sun rises farthest left on the horizon, and sets at its rightmost possible spot. Sunlight strikes places in your home that get illuminated at no other time.

almanac.com