the senate October 15th-19th **CONGRESS** 2017 the house


Senate Wrap Up For

October 19, 2017 Wrap Up for Thursday, October 19, 2017
October 18, 2017 Wrap Up for Wednesday, October 18, 2017
October 17, 2017 Wrap Up for Tuesday, October 17, 2017
October 16, 2017 Wrap Up for Monday, October 16, 2017

 

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House Activity 10/19/2017

12:00:02 P.M. The House convened, starting a new legislative day.
12:00:13 P.M. The Speaker designated the Honorable Darrell E. Issa to act as Speaker pro tempore for today.
12:00:37 P.M. Today’s prayer was offered by Rev. Gene Hemrick, St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, Washington, DC
12:01:13 P.M. SPEAKER’S APPROVAL OF THE JOURNAL – Pursuant to section 2(a) of H. Res. 562, the Journal of the last day’s proceedings was approved.
12:01:28 P.M. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE – The Chair led the House in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag.
12:02:00 P.M. The House received a message from the Clerk. Pursuant to the permission granted in Clause 2(h) of Rule II of the Rules of the U.S. House of Representatives the Clerk notified the House that she received the following message from the Secretary of the Senate on October 17, 2017 at 12:04 p.m.: that the Senate passed S. 705, and agreed to S. Con. Res. 26 and appointment: Congressional Award Board
12:02:32 P.M. The House received a message from the Clerk. Pursuant to the permission granted in Clause 2(h) of Rule II of the Rules of the U.S. House of Representatives, the Clerk notified the House that she received the following message from the Secretary of the Senate on October 17, 2017 at 3:24 p.m.: that the Senate agreed to a Conference with the House of Representatives on H.R. 2810
12:02:33 P.M. H.R. 2810 APPOINTMENT OF CONFEREE – Pursuant to clause 11 of rule I, the Chair announced the removal of the gentleman from Oregon, Mr. Walden, as a conferee and appointed the gentleman from Illinois, Mr. Shimkus, to fill the vacancy.
12:02:34 P.M. H.R. 2810 MODIFICATIONS OF INSTRUCTIONS TO CONFEREES – The Chair announced that the appointment of conferees from the Committee on Natural Resources on H.R. 2810 is modified by striking the first reference to section 2863.
12:03:48 P.M. The Speaker announced that the House do now adjourn pursuant to sec. 2(b) of H. Res. 562. The next meeting is scheduled for 12:00 p.m. on October 23, 2017.

House Activity 10/16/2017

10:00:05 A.M. The House convened, starting a new legislative day.
10:00:22 A.M. The Speaker designated the Honorable Rob Woodall to act as Speaker pro tempore for today.
10:00:38 A.M. Today’s prayer was offered by Monsignor Stephen Rossetti, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC
10:01:01 A.M. SPEAKER’S APPROVAL OF THE JOURNAL – Pursuant to section 2(a) of H. Res. 562, the Journal of the last day’s proceedings was approved.
10:01:26 A.M. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE – The Chair led the House in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag.
10:02:09 A.M. The House received a communication from Tim Murphy, Member of Congress. Pursuant to Rule VIII of the Rules of the U.S. House of Representatives, Mr. Murphy notified the House that he had been served with a subpoena for documents and testimony, issued by the Court of Common Pleas for Allegheny County and that after consultation with the Office of General Counsel, he would make determinations required by Rule VIII.
10:02:36 A.M. The Speaker announced that the House do now adjourn pursuant to section 2(b) of H. Res. 562. The next meeting is scheduled for 12:00 p.m. on October 19, 2017.

~ A Better Balance ~ Victory in NYC! ~


A Better Balance
Victory in NYC!
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Today, the New York City Council passed a law we championed expanding the protections of the Earned Sick Time Act, the landmark law we fought for and won in 2013. The new law will give 3.4 million workers new rights, called safe time, to time off when they or their families are facing domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, or human trafficking. It will also ensure that New York City workers can take the time they need to care for their chosen families, loved ones to whom they may not necessarily have a legal or biological relationship–a protection that is especially important for immigrant and LGBTQ families, veterans, and older adults. You can find out more on our blog.
At A Better Balance, we’ll keep fighting until all workers can be with their families in the face of illness or violence, no matter what those families look like.

on this day 1963, Some 225,000 students boycotted Chicago schools in Freedom Day protest of de facto segregation.


Civil rights issues were on many Americans’ minds in 1963. The growing movement was hard to ignore, even if you didn’t participate. Activists protested racial segregation nationwide, and protests sometimes turned violent.

In the spring, youth in Birmingham, Alabama, demonstrated against segregation in their city. In late summer, the focus shifted to Washington, DC, when 250,000 Americans marched for jobs and freedom. By fall, the movement had come north to Chicago.

Segregation Is Not Just a Southern Problem

As a student in Chicago in 1963, you couldn’t choose where to go to public school. You had to attend the one in your neighborhood. Since the city’s neighborhoods were either black or white so were its schools. Public schools in black neighborhoods were often outdated and always overcrowded. Although Superintendent Ben Willis and the Chicago Board of Education tried to improve these conditions, they resisted integration.

Marching for Change

On October 22, 1963, a coalition of civil rights groups staged Freedom Day, a mass boycott and demonstration against segregated schools and inadequate resources for black students. Almost half of Chicago’s public school students skipped class, leaving many schools on the South and West Sides virtually empty.

The climax of Freedom Day was the march to the downtown office of the Chicago Board of Education. Thousands took to the streets, carrying signs that voiced their frustrations. Many targeted Superintendent Ben Willis, comparing him to segregationist George Wallace, the governor of Alabama. Police met the nearly 10,000 protestors and prevented them from entering the Chicago Board of Education building.

The protest ignited other demonstrations, each demanding an end to segregation in Chicago. Change occurred slowly, but this activism led to increasing support for integration and revealed that racial segregation extended beyond the south.

Explore the School Boycott collection.