Apr 8 1968 Coretta Scott King Leads Silent Memorial March For Martin Luther King Jr.


An assassin snuffed out Dr. King’s life on April 4, 1968, while he led a strike of 1,300 black sanitation workers – the working poor of their day – to demand the right to have a union.
Many whites in Memphis, calling him a communist and racial agitator, said they were glad he was dead.

In this frightening atmosphere, Mrs. King and three of her children led some 20,000 marchers through the streets of Memphis on April 8, holding signs that read, “Honor King: End Racism,” “Union Justice Now,” or, simply, “I Am A Man.” National Guardsmen lined the streets, perched on M-48 tanks, bayonets mounted, as helicopters circled overhead. She led another 150,000 in a funeral procession through the streets of Atlanta the next day.

Her quiet courage and composed demeanor renewed people’s sense of pride, courage and respect for the peaceful principles the civil-rights movement stood for. In the wake of King’s death, riots spread to 125 cities, leading to the deaths of 43 and arrests of more than 20,000 people, with the deployment of 60,000 National Guardsmen to suppress the rebellion – the largest military intervention in domestic affairs since the Civil War.

Source: Michael Honey/Seattle Times (April 2nd, 2006) Added by: Colin Harris

1832 – About 300 American troops of the 6th Infantry left Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, to confront the Sauk Indians in the Black Hawk War.


The Black Hawk war took place in Illinois and southern Wisconsin in the spring and summer of 1832. A band of Native Americans consisting of members of the Sauk tribe plus smaller numbers of other allied tribes under the leadership of the Sauk Chief Black Hawk crossed from Iowa into Illinois to dispute American expansion into their territory.

Black Hawk and his followers were defeated in the last military campaign against Native Americans east of the Mississippi River. Black Hawk surrendered at Fort Crawford in Prairie du Chien Wisconsin in August 1832, ending the war. Several individuals who played prominent roles in the Civil War served in the Black Hawk War,

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April 8 1864 – The U.S. Senate passed the 13th Amendment (S.J. Res. 16) by a vote of 38 to 6.


The 13th Amendment:

Image result for 13th amendment

· After the decisive battle of Antietam in September, 1862, when the Union beat the Confederate troops, President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring that all slaves in the rebelling states were free as of January 1, 1863. Lincoln’s speech changed the tone of the Civil War from a battle about the rights of states versus the rights of the central government. The Civil War became about ending slavery once and for all. Lincoln realized that the Emancipation Proclamation was symbolic. He began lobbying Congress to amend the U.S. Constitution to end slavery.

· April 8, 1864 – The Senate passed the Thirteenth Amendment

· June 15, 1864 – The House of Representatives initially defeated the 13th Amendment by a vote of 93 in favor, 65 opposed, and 23 not voting, which is less that two-thirds majority needed to pass a Constitutional Amendment.

· January 31, 1865 – The House of Representatives passed the 13th Amendment by a vote of 119 to 56.

· February 1. 1865 – President Abraham Lincoln signed a Joint Resolution submitting the proposed 13th Amendment to the states.

· December 18, 1865 – Secretary of State William Seward issued a statement verifying the ratification of the 13th Amendment.

· The first bill introducing the anti-slavery 13th Amendment was introduced into the House of Representatives by James Mitchell Ashley (Ohio), on December 14, 1864, nearly a year after President Lincoln issued the final executive order for the Emancipation Proclamation.

· The Senate Judiciary Committee drafted the final language for the 13th Amendment. The language of the amendment is simple. It is written in two sections.

· Section I of the 13th Amendment states; “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.”

· Section II of the 13th Amendment states; “Congress shall have the power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.”

history… april 8


1513 – Explorer Juan Ponce de Leon claimed Florida for Spain.

1525 – Albert von Brandenburg, the leader of the Teutonic Order, assumes the title “Duke of Prussia” and passed the first laws of the Protestant church, making Prussia a Protestant state.

1789 – The U.S. House of Representatives held its first meeting.

1832 – About 300 American troops of the 6th Infantry left Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, to confront the Sauk Indians in the Black Hawk War.

1834 – In New York City, Cornelius Lawrence became the first mayor to be elected by popular vote in a city election.

1839 – The first Intercollegiate Rodeo was held at the Godshall Ranch, Apple Valley, CA.

1864 – The U.S. Senate passed the 13th Amendment (S.J. Res. 16) by a vote of 38 to 6.

1873 – Alfred Paraf patented the first successful oleomargarine.

1911 – The first squash tournament was played at the Harvard Club in New York City.

1913 – The Seventeenth amendment was ratified, requiring direct election of senators.

1935 – The Works Progress Administration was approved by the U.S. Congress.

1939 – Italy invaded Albania.

1942 – The Soviets opened a rail link to the besieged city of Leningrad.

1943 – Wendell Wilkie’s “One World” was published for the first time.

1946 – The League of Nations assembled in Geneva for the last time.

1947 – The first illustrated insurance policy was issued by the Allstate Insurance Company.

1952 – U.S. President Truman seized steel mills to prevent a nationwide strike.

1953 – The bones of Sitting Bull were moved from North Dakota to South Dakota.

1962 – Bay of Pigs invaders got thirty years imprisonment in Cuba.

1974 – Hank Aaron hits 715th home run breaking Babe Ruth’s record.

1975 – Frank Robinson of the Cleveland Indians became first black manager of a major league baseball team.

1985 – India filed suit against Union Carbide for the Bhopal disaster.

1985 – Phyllis Diller underwent a surgical procedure for permanent eyeliner to eliminate the need for eyelid makeup.

1986 – Clint Eastwood was elected mayor of Carmel, CA.

1987 – Los Angeles Dodgers executive Al Campanis resigned over remarks he had made. While on ABC’s “Nightline” Campanis said that blacks “may not have some of the necessities” to hold managerial jobs in major-league baseball.

1988 – Former U.S. President Reagan aid Lyn Nofzinger was sentenced to prison for illegal lobbying for Wedtech Corp.

1990 – In Nepal, King Birendra lifted the 30-year ban on political parties.

1992 – In Britain, the last issue of “Punch Magazine” was published.

1994 – Smoking was banned in the Pentagon and all U.S. military bases.

1998 – The widow of Martin Luther King Jr. presented new evidence in an appeal for new federal investigation of the assassination of her husband.

2000 – 19 U.S. troops were killed when a Marine V22 Osprey crashed during a training mission in Arizona.

2001 – Microsoft Corp. released Internet Explorer 6.0.

2002 – Ed McMahon filed a $20 million lawsuit against his insurance company, two insurance adjusters, and several environmental cleanup contractors. The suit alleged breach of contract, negligence and intentional infliction of emotional distress concerning a toxic mold that had spread through McMahon’s Beverly Hills home.

2002 – Suzan-Lori Parks became the first African-American woman to win a Pulitzer Prize for drama for her play “Topdog/Underdog.”

Source: on-this-day.com

Equal Pay Day ~~ the Senate considers S2199,Fair Labor s.Act1938 ~~ CONGRESS 4/8 ~~ the House ~~ Equal Pay Day


equalworkequalpay

Following any Leader remarks, the Senate will be in a period of morning business until 12:30pm with the time equally divided between the two Leaders or their designees.

The Senate recess from 12:30pm until 2:15pm to allow for the weekly caucus meetings.

The Majority will control the time from 2:15pm until 3:15pm and the Republicans will control the time from 3:15pm until 4:15pm.

Senator Reid filed cloture on the motion to proceed to Calendar #345, S.2199, to amend the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 to provide more effective remedies to victims of discrimination in the payment of wages on the basis of sex. Unless an agreement can be reached, the cloture vote would occur on Wednesday, April 9.

McConnell UC request: Senator McConnell asked unanimous consent that if cloture is invoked on the motion to proceed to S.2199, all post-cloture time be yielded back and the Senate proceed to the consideration of the bill, and that it be in order for Senator McConnell to offer amendment #2962 (flex time), and then for the Majority Leader, or his designee, to offer an amendment and it then be in order for the Leaders or designees, to continue to offer unlimited amendments in an alternating fashion.   Senator Reid objected.   Thune UC request:

Senator Thune then asked consent that if cloture is invoked on the motion to proceed to S.2199, all post-cloture time be yielded back and the Senate proceed to the consideration of the bill, and that it be in order for Senator Thune to offer amendment #2964 (Republican agenda/alternative), and then for the Majority Leader, or his designee, to offer an amendment and it then be in order for the Leaders, or designees, to continue to offer unlimited amendments in an alternating fashion with the following amendments on the Republican side in order:

–       McConnell #2962 (comp time/flexible credit hour program)

–       Fischer #2963 (substitute Workplace Advancement Act)

–       Alexander #2965 (flex time)

–       Lee #2966 (compensatory time for employees in the private sector)

 

Senator Reid objected.

At 4:30pm today, the Senate will proceed to a series of up to 2 roll call votes on confirmation of the following nominations:

 Executive Calendar #556 Neil Gregory Kornze, of Nevada, to be Director of the Bureau of Land Management; and

Executive Calendar #502 Frank G. Klotz, of Virginia, to be Under Secretary for Nuclear Security.

 We expect a voice vote on the Klotz nomination

4:32pm The Senate began a 15 minute roll call vote on confirmation of Executive Calendar #556 Neil Gregory Kornze, of Nevada, to be Director of the Bureau of Land Management.

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Last Floor Action: 5:42:27 P.M. – SPECIAL ORDER SPEECHES – The House has concluded all anticipated legislative business and has proceeded to Special Order speeches.

Last Floor Action:4/7

Take Action! 8:31:04 P.M. – The House adjourned.

The next meeting is scheduled for 10:00 a.m. on April 8, 2014.

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