1963 – Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King began the first non-violent campaign in Birmingham, AL.


Firemen turn fire hoses on demonstrators, Birmingham, Alabama, 1963
Photo by Charles Moore. Fair Use Image

The Birmingham Campaign was a movement led in early 1963 by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) which sought to bring national attention of the efforts of local black leaders to desegregate public facilities in Birmingham, Alabama. The campaign was led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Reverends James Bevel and Fred Shuttlesworth, among others.

In April 1963, King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) joined Birmingham’s local campaign organized by Rev. Shuttlesworth and his group, the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights (ACMHR). The goal of the local campaign was to attack the city’s segregation system by putting pressure on Birmingham’s merchants during the Easter season, the second biggest shopping season of the year. When that campaign stalled, the ACMHR asked SCLC to help.

The campaign was originally scheduled to begin in early March 1963 but was postponed until April. On April 3, 1963, it was launched with mass meetings, lunch counter sit-ins, a march on city hall, and a boycott of downtown merchants. King spoke to Birmingham’s black citizens about nonviolence and its methods and appealed for volunteers. When Birmingham’s residents enthusiastically responded, the campaign’s actions expanded to kneel-ins at churches, sit-ins at the library, and a march on the county courthouse to register voters.

For the complete article go to: blackpast.org

a message from Governor inslee… Covid19


I have a few important updates for you on vaccine eligibility here in Washington.

Starting April 15, all Washingtonians 16 and older will be eligible for the vaccine.

But that’s not the only great news! We’ve just opened up eligibility now for an additional 2 million people before eligibility widens later this month: people 16 years or older with two or more underlying conditions, all people age 60 and older (regardless of health conditions), staff and volunteers in certain congregate living settings, and high-risk critical workers in certain congregate settings. Find a full list of who is now eligible by reviewing the Department of Health’s vaccine allocation and prioritization guidance.

If you or someone you know is now eligible — or if you were already eligible but are still having trouble finding appointments — you can use the new Vaccine Locator tool, which has helped more than 400,000 Washingtonians make their vaccine appointments. If you need additional help, please call the COVID-19 Information Hotline at 1-800-525-0127, then press #.

I’ll have more updates for you soon, but until then, continue to mask up and stay safe.

Very truly yours,

Jay

Easter Sunday: Naturally Dyeing Easter Eggs


Not only will you save some money by making your own dye, but you’ll also discover how easy it is to store extra dye in your fridge to save for periodic egg decorating sessions throughout the Easter season. You’ll also need an empty egg carton, strainer, gloves,  white vinegar and salt.

How to Naturally Dye Easter Eggs

Each dye color requires the same process—you just need to substitute the final ingredient to change the color.

Bring 1 quart of water, 1 tablespoon of salt, 2 tablespoons of vinegar, and 2 tablespoons of the respective fruit, vegetable, or spice (to create the color) to a boil.

Let simmer for 30 minutes, and then remove pot from burner. Be sure to strain the dye, and let sit until it’s room temperature before dipping your eggs.

For dark blue: Use blueberries.
For light blue: Use red cabbage.
For beige: Use coffee.
For orange: Use onions.
For yellow: Use saffron or carrot turmeric.
For green: Use parsley or spinach.
For purple: Use red wine.
For pink: Use beets.

Save the chart as a handy egg color guide.

resource: countryliving.com

 

History… April 2


1513 – Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de Leon sighted Florida. The next day he went ashore.

1792 – The U.S. Congress passed the Coinage Act to regulate the coins of the United States. The act authorized $10 Eagles, $5 Half Eagles, $2.50 Quarter Eagle gold coins, silver dollars, dollars, quarters, dimes and half-dimes to be minted.

1801 – During the Napoleonic Wars, the Danish fleet was destroyed by the British at the Battle of Copenhagen.

1860 – The first Italian Parliament met in Turin.

1865 – Confederate President Davis and most of his Cabinet fled the Confederate capital of Richmond, VA.

1872 – G.B. Brayton received a patent for the gas-powered streetcar.

1877 – The first Egg Roll was held on the grounds of the White House in Washington, DC.

1889 – Charles Hall patented aluminum.

1902 – The first motion picture theatre opened in Los Angeles with the name Electric Theatre.

1905 – The Simplon rail tunnel officially opened. The tunnel went under the Alps and linked Switzerland and Italy.

1910 – Karl Harris perfected the process for the artificial synthesis of rubber.

1914 – The U.S. Federal Reserve Board announced plans to divide the country into 12 districts.

1917 – U.S. President Woodrow Wilson presented a declaration of war against Germany to the U.S. Congress.

1932 – A $50,000 ransom was paid for the infant son of Charles and Anna Lindbergh. He child was not returned and was found dead the next month.

1935 – Sir Watson-Watt was granted a patent for RADAR.

1944 – The Soviet Union announced that its troops had crossed the Prut River and entered Romania.

1947 – “The Big Story” debuted on NBC radio. It was on the air for eight years.

1947 – The U.N. Security Council voted to appoint the U.S. as trustee for former Japanese-held Pacific Islands.

1951 – U.S. General Dwight Eisenhower assumed command of all allied forces in the Western Mediterranean area and Europe.

1956 – “The Edge of Night” and “As the World Turns” debuted on CBS-TV.

1958 – The National Advisory Council on Aeronautics was renamed NASA.

1960 – France signed an agreement with Madagascar that proclaimed the country an independent state within the French community.

1963 – Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King began the first non-violent campaign in Birmingham, AL.

1966 – South Vietnamese troops joined in demonstrations at Hue and Da Nang for an end to military rule.

1967 – In Peking, hundreds of thousands demonstrated against Mao foe Liu Shao-chi.

1972 – Burt Reynolds appeared nude in “Cosmopolitan” magazine.

1978 – The first episode of “Dallas” aired on CBS.

1981 – In Lebanon, thirty-seven people were reported killed during fighting in the cities of Beirut and Zahle. It was the worst violence since the 1976 cease fire.

1982 – Argentina invaded the British-owned Falkland Islands. The following June Britain took the islands back.

1983 – The New Jersey Transit strike that began on March 1 came to an end.

1984 – John Thompson became the first black coach to lead his team to the NCAA college basketball championship.

1984 – In Jerusalem, three Arab gunmen wounded 48 people when they opened fire into a crowd of shoppers.

1985 – The NCAA Rules Committee adopted the 45-second shot clock for men’s basketball to begin in the 1986 season.

1986 – On a TWA airliner flying from Rome to Athens a bomb exploded under a seat killing four Americans.

1987 – The speed limit on U.S. interstate highways was increased to 65 miles per hour in limited areas.

1988 – U.S. Special Prosecutor James McKay declined to indict Attorney General Edwin Meese for criminal wrongdoing.

1989 – An editorial in the “New York Times” declared that the Cold War was over.

1989 – General Prosper Avril, Haiti’s military leader, survived a coup attempt. The attempt was apparently provoked by Avril’s U.S.-backed efforts to fight drug trafficking.

1990 – Iraqi President Saddam Hussein threatened to incinerate half of Israel with chemical weapons if Israel joined a conspiracy against Iraq.

1992 – Mob boss John Gotti was convicted in New York of murder and racketeering. He was later sentenced to life in prison.

1995 – The costliest strike in professional sports history ended when baseball owners agreed to let players play without a contract.

1996 – Russia and Belarus signed a treaty that created a political and economic alliance in an effort to reunite the two former Soviet republics.

1996 – Lech Walesa resumed his old job as an electrician at the Gdansk shipyard. He was the former Solidarity union leader who became Poland’s first post-war democratic president.

2002 – Israeli troops surrounded the Church of the Nativity. More than 200 Palestinians had taken refuge at the church when Israel invaded Bethlehem.

2013 – The United Nations General Assembly adopted the Arms Trade Treaty to regulate the international trade of conventional weapons.

2014 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that limits on the total amount of money individuals can give political candidates and political action committees were unconstitutional.

on-this-day.com