Lonnie G. Bunch at The NMAAHC


NMAAHC -- National Museum of African American History and CultureEducation Steeped in African American Culture: Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Lonnie Bunch, museum director, historian, lecturer, and author, is proud to present A Page from Our American Story, a regular on-line series for Museum supporters. It will showcase individuals and events in the African American experience, placing these stories in the context of a larger story — our American story.A Page From Our American Story

Howard University, Washington, DC

Before the Civil War, when the majority of African Americans in the United States were enslaved, educational opportunities for African Americans in the South were virtually non-existent, particularly for higher education. Those like Frederick Douglass who did pursue an education –in spite of it being illegal for him to do so –were forced to study informally and often on their own. In 1837, a group of Philadelphia Quakers concerned that African Americans in the North were having a difficult time competing for jobs against the influx of immigrants, created the Institute for Colored Youth. It was the first institution of higher learning for African Americans. We know it today as Cheyney University of Pennsylvania.

The next crucial moment for African American higher education came in the years between the Civil War and World War I when the nation made a commitment to university studies across the country, predominately due to the government’s “land-grants” to help states form colleges and universities. Unprecedented funds poured into the creation of public colleges and universities, but few of these emerging institutions were open or inviting to African American students.

This left the African American community to spearhead their own movement toward higher education. With the support of the American Missionary Association and the Freedmen’s Bureau, seven black colleges had been founded by 1870. Many of these, including Fisk University (1866), Howard University (1867), Claflin University (1869), and Dillard University (1869) are still graduating students today.

Over the past 150 years, there have been many notable moments in the evolution of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Among the most striking occurred in the early part of the twentieth century, when two graduates from these fledgling institutions began a debate about the direction African American higher learning should take.

On one side was Booker T. Washington, a freed slave from Virginia who had taken the helm of the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, now Tuskegee University. Washington believed that the best way for freed slaves and other African Americans to attain equality in the United States was to focus on preparing themselves for the jobs that were available, mainly agricultural and mechanical trades.

Booker T. Wahington WEB DuBois.jpg

Farther north, W.E.B. DuBois had a very different view. DuBois was raised in Massachusetts and wasn’t exposed to segregation until he was an undergraduate at Fisk University in Nashville. He believed African Americans needed to look beyond vocational training. Equality would only come if African Americans studied the arts and sciences and became thought leaders for the next generation.

Black colleges and universities responded by trying to create programs that reflected both the practical necessities that Washington espoused as well as DuBois’ broader intellectual vision. By 1943 the struggle for funding led Dr. Fredrick D. Patterson, president of the Tuskegee Institute, to publish an open letter to the presidents of other black colleges and universities. He urged them to pool their resources and fundraising abilities and work together to help all black colleges and universities prosper. Just one year later, the United Negro College Fund (UNCF) was created to solicit donations for black colleges nationwide. The UNCF still exists today and has provided $3.6 billion in support to HBCUs and higher education for African Americans in the United States.

Throughout the ups and downs of HBCUs, the students who have attended these institutions have thrived and gone on to influence many important fields. Thurgood Marshall, Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., Alice Walker and Charles Drew, the physician who organized the first large-scale blood bank in the United States, to name just a few, were all alumni of HBCUs.

Still today, HBCUs are standouts for student achievement. While representing just three percent of the nation’s institutions of higher learning, they graduate nearly 20 percent of African Americans. In addition, the institutions graduate more than 50 percent of African American professionals and public school teachers, as well as the majority of the African American doctoral degree recipients.

HBCUs no longer exclusively serve African Americans. Today’s institutions have a significant percentage of non-African American students, including Asian, Latino, white American and students from many foreign countries. All of these students benefit from the unique education steeped in African American history and culture that HBCUs provide.

Students attending HBCUs are immersed in a nurturing and intellectually stimulating environment that connects them with African-American history and inspires them to carry the indefatigable African American spirit forward. Through rigorous academics and enriching extra-curricular options on campus including an energetic network of fraternities and sororities, students acquire a deep appreciation for excellence, a passion for community service, and a commitment to become leaders and mentors for the next generation.

When African American students have many options for higher learning, HBCUs are still in high demand because of their unique educational environment and their proven record of helping African Americans achieve success. After nearly more than 150 years, HBCUs continue to keep their eyes on the horizon and will surely be reflecting and shaping the African American experience for many generations to come.

 dd-enews-temp-lonnie-bunch-2.jpg All the best,

Lonnie Bunch
Director

P.S. We can only reach our $250 million goal with your help. I hope you will consider making a donation or becoming a Charter Member today.

To read past Our American Stories, visit our archives.

Do employees in Washington deserve the right to paid sick leave?


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Do employees in Washington deserve the right to paid sick leave?

Yes.

Do workers in Washington deserve the right to fair pay?

Yes.

Do we — right now — have the opportunity to lead the nation in creating an economy that works for all Washingtonians?

Yes.

This week, the Washington state House is hearing bills on both guaranteeing paid sick leave and raising the minimum wage.

Workers shouldn’t have to choose between their health — and their families’ health — and putting food on the table. That’s why guaranteeing that most employers provide paid sick leave is the right thing to do.

Raising the minimum wage is fair to workers, and it’ll boost our state’s economy as whole. When workers have more money to spend, local businesses across the state benefit. Raising the minimum wage to $12 an hour is not only fair — it’s smart.

While these two bills are being heard in the House, it’s critical that we build up public support for a Washington economy that works for all. Washington is the best place in the country to live and work. Let’s keep leading by supporting these two bills. Will you sign on today?

Join me in supporting a Washington that works for all, and sign on in support of paid sick leave and raising the minimum wage.

Along with improving our infrastructure, investing in education, and supporting an accessible healthcare system, guaranteeing paid sick leave and a fair minimum wage are essential to providing a Washington that works and provides opportunity for all.

Thank you for your commitment to creating a better Washington.

Very truly yours,

Jay Inslee

The Merger …


By

Merging ATF With The FBI Will Lead To Better Enforcement Of Our Gun Laws

A new report out today from the Center for American Progress finds that the challenges facing the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) as it attempts to fulfill its mission of enforcing gun laws and regulating the gun industry are so deeply ingrained, and the agency so politically vulnerable, that ATF should cease to operate as a standalone law enforcement agency and should instead be merged into the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI).

ATF currently faces a number of serious challenges as the primary federal enforcer of gun laws. Before August 2013, the ATF worked for seven years without a confirmed director, because of the refusal of gun lobby allies in the Senate to confirm any nominee to the position, and now the Bureau finds itself without a permanent leader once again. In addition, ATF is staring at a serious lack of funding, burdensome restrictions and jurisdictional conflict and overlap with the FBI. A merger would strengthen enforcement of our gun laws and increase efficiency.

Another significant part of the ATF’s current challenges is the fact that the gun lobby, led by the National Rifle Association (NRA), has undertaken a 30-year campaign to weaken and undermine the agency. These efforts include:

  • A demonstrated campaign of vilifying ATF agents as “jack-booted thugs” and wanting to “attack law abiding citizens” after the flawed operations in Waco and Ruby Ridge.
  • Enacting more than a dozen budget riders severely limiting ATF’s ability to collect data and conduct oversight of gun dealers and illegal firearms.
  • Exercising a near absolute veto over every nominee for director of ATF following a successful lobbying effort to require that nominees receive Senate confirmation.

The NRA likes to talk a big game about how we don’t need more gun laws, but better enforcement of existing ones. Yet this rhetoric is belied by their consistent opposition to allowing agencies like ATF to enforce existing gun laws and do their jobs. If they are honest about stronger enforcement, the recommendation proposed in CAP’s report is worth serious consideration. But in response to the CAP proposal, the NRA shot back that “[r]egardless of where ATF is located, the reality is that nothing will change until we have a president who respects the Second Amendment.” Rather than standing for fair-minded reform and working towards better gun safety, the NRA is once again more concerned with posturing against the current administration and undermining enforcement.

BOTTOM LINE: ATF is an important tool in the fight for gun safety. Every day, thousands of the Bureau’s dedicated agents and civilian staff fight to keep guns out of the hands of criminals. Merging ATF with the FBI would strengthen these efforts, solve persistent leadership and resource challenges, and increase efficiency. With 33 Americans murdered each day with guns, it is time to think big about how best to enforce gun laws and reduce gun violence.

Raped and no right to choose — 24 hours to help


A 10-year-old girl in Paraguay was reportedly sexually abused by her stepfather for years. Now pregnant, the government denied her the abortion she asked for — but Congress is reconsidering the law in a special session this week, and it could turn the tide. Let’s launch a massive global outcry so this child, and thousands like her, will have a choice:

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/paraguays_choice_loc/?biEWLbb&v=58671

the Senate CONGRESS 5/20 the House


Obama Launches DNC Campaign Tour At Illinois State CapitolThe Senate stands adjourned until 9:30am on Wednesday, May 20, 2015.

Following any Leader remarks, the Senate will resume consideration of H.R.1314 the legislative vehicle for trade legislation.

As a reminder, Senator McConnell filed cloture on the Hatch amendment #1221 (substitute) and on the underlying bill. Unless an agreement is reached, the cloture vote on the substitute amendment will be 1 hour after the Senate convenes on Thursday. There is a 1:00pm filing deadline tomorrow, Wednesday, for all first-degree amendments.

WRAP UP

Legislative Business

H.Con.Res.47, to correct the enrollment of S.178, Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act of 2015

The Senate began the Rule 14 process to place on the Calendar of Business H.R.2353, 2 month highway extension.

No Executive Business

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Last Floor Action:
10:01:09 P.M. – The House adjourned pursuant to a previous special order.

The next meeting is scheduled for 10:00 a.m. on May 21, 2015.

Last Floor Action:
10:41:54 A.M. – The Speaker announced that the House do now recess.

The next meeting is scheduled for 12:00 P.M. today.

10:00:01 A.M. The House convened, starting a new legislative day.
10:00:05 A.M. The Speaker designated the Honorable Earl L. “Buddy” Carter to act as Speaker pro tempore for today.
10:00:09 A.M. MORNING-HOUR DEBATE – The House proceeded with Morning-Hour Debate. At the conclusion of Morning-Hour, the House will recess until 12:00 p.m. for the start of legislative business.
10:41:54 A.M. The Speaker announced that the House do now recess. The next meeting is scheduled for 12:00 P.M. today.
12:00:24 P.M. The House convened, returning from a recess continuing the legislative day of May 20.
12:00:30 P.M. Today’s prayer was offered by Minister Michael Greene, Lehman Avenue Church of Christ, Bowling Greene, Kentucky
12:02:03 P.M. The Speaker announced approval of the Journal. Pursuant to clause 1, rule I, the Journal stands approved.
12:02:06 P.M. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE – The Chair designated Ms. Kuster to lead the Members in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag.
12:02:07 P.M. ONE MINUTE SPEECHES – The House proceeded with one minute speeches which by direction of the Chair, would be limited to 15 per side of the aisle.
12:45:21 P.M. H. Res. 273 Considered as privileged matter. H. Res. 273 — “Providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 2262) to facilitate a pro-growth environment for the developing commercial space industry by encouraging private sector investment and creating more stable and predictable regulatory conditions, and for other purposes; providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 880) to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to simplify and make permanent the research credit; providing for consideration of motions to suspend the rules; and providing for proceedings during the period from May 22, 2015, through May 29, 2015.”
12:50:34 P.M. H. Res. 273 DEBATE – The House proceeded with one hour of debate on H. Res. 273.
1:50:59 P.M. H. Res. 273 On ordering the previous question Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: 241 – 183 (Roll no. 250).
1:51:00 P.M. MOMENT OF SILENCE – The House observed a moment of silence for those affected by the tragic train derailment in Philadephia, Pennsylvania.
2:03:27 P.M. H. Res. 273 On agreeing to the resolution Agreed to by recorded vote: 240 – 185 (Roll no. 251).
2:03:28 P.M. H. Res. 273 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
2:03:43 P.M. H.R. 880 Considered under the provisions of rule H. Res. 273. H.R. 880 — “To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to simplify and make permanent the research credit.”
2:03:48 P.M. H.R. 880 The resolution provides for consideration of H.R. 2262 and H.R. 880. In addition, the resolution provides for consideration of motions to suspend the rules; and provides for proceedings during the period from May 22, 2015, through May 29, 2015.
2:09:20 P.M. H.R. 880 ORDER OF PROCEDURE – Mr. Ryan (WI) asked unanimous consent that the question of adopting a motion to recommit on H.R. 880 may be subject to postponement as though under clause 8 of rule 20.
2:09:25 P.M. H.R. 880 DEBATE – The House proceeded with one hour of debate on H.R. 880.
3:09:24 P.M. H.R. 880 The previous question was ordered pursuant to the rule.
3:09:44 P.M. H.R. 880 Mr. Neal moved to recommit with instructions to the Committee on Ways and Means.
3:09:57 P.M. H.R. 880 Floor summary: DEBATE – The House proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Neal motion to recommit with instructions. The instructions contained in the motion seek to require the bill to be reported back to the House with an amendment to extend the research and development tax credit for two years, through December 31, 2016.
3:17:45 P.M. H.R. 880 The previous question on the motion to recommit with instructions was ordered without objection.
3:17:54 P.M. H.R. 880 POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – At the conclusion of debate on the Neal motion to recommit with instructions, the Chair put the question on adoption of the motion to recommit and by voice vote, announced that the noes had prevailed. Mr. Neal demanded the yeas and nays and pursuant to the order of the House of today, the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of adoption until a time to be announced.
3:18:12 P.M. H.R. 1806 Considered under the provisions of rule H. Res. 271. H.R. 1806 — “To provide for technological innovation through the prioritization of Federal investment in basic research, fundamental scientific discovery, and development to improve the competitiveness of the United States, and for other purposes.”
3:18:55 P.M. H.R. 1806 House resolved itself into the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union pursuant to H. Res. 271 and Rule XVIII.
3:18:56 P.M. H.R. 1806 The Speaker designated the Honorable Kevin Yoder to act as Chairman of the Committee.
3:19:02 P.M. H.R. 1806 GENERAL DEBATE – The Committee of the Whole proceeded with one hour of general debate on H.R. 1806.
4:08:43 P.M. H.R. 1806 An amendment, offered by Mr. Smith (TX), No. 1 printed in part A of House Report 114-120 to make technical corrections.
4:08:47 P.M. H.R. 1806 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 271, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Smith (TX) part A amendment No. 1.
4:11:15 P.M. H.R. 1806 On agreeing to the Smith (TX) amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
4:12:49 P.M. H.R. 1806 An amendment, offered by Ms. Johnson, E. B., No. 2 printed in part A of House Report 114-120 to strike section 106 of the bill.
4:12:52 P.M. H.R. 1806 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 271, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the E.B. Johnson amendment part A amendment No. 2.
4:25:33 P.M. H.R. 1806 POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – At the conclusion of debate on the E.B. Johnson amendment, the Chair put the question on adoption of the amendment and by voice vote, announced that the noes had prevailed. Mr. Foster demanded a recorded vote and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of adoption of the amendment until a time to be announced.
4:26:11 P.M. H.R. 1806 An amendment, offered by Ms. Jackson Lee, No. 3 printed in part A of House Report 114-120 to create state and regional workshops to train K-12 teachers in science and technology project-based learning to provide instruction in initiating robotics and other STEM competition team development programs; and leverage the collaboration among higher education, businesses, and local private as well as public education agencies to support STEM efforts at schools located in areas with 1 percent or more above the national unemployment rate.
4:26:15 P.M. H.R. 1806 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 271, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Jackson Lee part A amendment No. 3.
4:30:54 P.M. H.R. 1806 On agreeing to the Jackson Lee amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
4:31:23 P.M. H.R. 1806 An amendment, offered by Ms. Esty, No. 4 printed in part A of House Report 114-120 to instruct NSF’s I-Corps to support and invest in female entrepreneurs.
4:31:25 P.M. H.R. 1806 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 271, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Esty part A amendment No. 4.
4:37:22 P.M. H.R. 1806 On agreeing to the Esty amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
4:38:49 P.M. H.R. 1806 An amendment, offered by Mr. Crowley, No. 5 printed in part A of House Report 114-120 to require the National Science Foundation to establish a STEM grant program for Hispanic-serving institutions as authorized in the America COMPETES Act of 2007.
4:38:51 P.M. H.R. 1806 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 271, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Crowley part A amendment No. 5.
4:46:01 P.M. H.R. 1806 On agreeing to the Crowley amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
4:47:23 P.M. H.R. 1806 An amendment, offered by Mr. Griffith, No. 6 printed in part A of House Report 114-120 to provide for the Speaker of the House and Senate Majority Leader to appoint members to congressionally created advisory boards.
4:47:26 P.M. H.R. 1806 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 271, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Griffith part A amendment No. 6.
4:56:15 P.M. H.R. 1806 POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – At the conclusion of debate on the Griffith amendment, the Chair put the question on adoption of the amendment and by voice vote, announced that the ayes had prevailed. Mrs. E.B. Johnson demanded a recorded vote and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of adoption of the amendment until a time to be announced.
4:57:02 P.M. H.R. 1806 An amendment, offered by Mr. Kelly (PA), No. 7 printed in part A of House Report 114-120 to increase the authorized funding for the Manufacturing Extension Partnership by $5 million, while decreasing the authorized funding level for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by $5 million.
4:57:04 P.M. H.R. 1806 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 271, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Kelly (PA) part A amendment No. 7.
5:06:15 P.M. H.R. 1806 On agreeing to the Kelly (PA) amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
5:07:39 P.M. H.R. 1806 An amendment, offered by Mr. Lowenthal, No. 8 printed in part A of House Report 114-120 to eliminate additional DOE reporting requirements and restrictions on sound scientific processes to independently verify scientific results.
5:07:41 P.M. H.R. 1806 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 271, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Lowenthal part A amendment No. 8.
5:16:45 P.M. H.R. 1806 POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – At the conclusion of debate on the Lowenthal amendment, the Chair put the question on adoption of the amendment and by voice vote, announced that the noes had prevailed. Mr. Lowenthal demanded a recorded vote and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of adoption of the amendment until a time to be announced.
5:17:14 P.M. H.R. 1806 An amendment, offered by Mr. Grayson, No. 9 printed in part A of House Report 114-120 to authorize the Energy Innovation Hubs Program within the Department of Energy.
5:17:17 P.M. H.R. 1806 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provsions of H. Res. 271, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Grayson part A amendment No. 9.
5:19:57 P.M. H.R. 1806 On agreeing to the Grayson amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
5:20:20 P.M. H.R. 1806 An amendment, offered by Ms. Bonamici, No. 10 printed in part A of House Report 114-120 to allow the Department of Energy to continue partnering with the Department of Defense to produce biofuels for the military.
5:20:22 P.M. H.R. 1806 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 271, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Bonamici part A amendment No. 10.
5:30:43 P.M. H.R. 1806 POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – At the conclusion of debate on the Bonamici amendment, the Chair put the question on adoption of the amendment and by voice vote, announced that the noes had prevailed. Ms. Bonamici demanded a recorded vote and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of adoption of the amendment until a time to be announced.
5:31:42 P.M. H.R. 1806 An amendment, offered by Mr. Beyer, No. 11 printed in part A of House Report 114-120 to remove `reductions of energy-related emissions, including greenhouse gases’ from goals of ARPA-E.
5:31:46 P.M. H.R. 1806 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 271, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Beyer part A amendment No. 11.
5:40:17 P.M. H.R. 1806 POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – At the conclusion of debate on the Beyer amendment, the Chair put the question on adoption of the amendment and by voice vote, announced that the noes had prevailed. Mr. Beyer demanded a recorded vote and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of adoption of the amendment until a time to be announced.
5:40:43 P.M. H.R. 1806 An amendment, offered by Ms. Johnson, E. B., No. 12 printed in Part A of House Report 114-120 to provide for sustained growth and sensible policies across the scientific agencies, in keeping with the goals of the original Competes legislation.
5:41:14 P.M. H.R. 1806 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 271, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 20 minutes of debate on the E.B. Johnson substitute amendment part A amendment No. 12.
5:58:33 P.M. H.R. 1806 POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – At the conclusion of debate on the E.B. Johnson amendment, the Chair put the question on adoption of the amendment and by voice vote, announced that the noes had prevailed. Ms. E.B. Johnson demanded a recorded vote and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of adoption of the amendment until a time to be announced.
5:58:54 P.M. H.R. 1806 UNFINISHED BUSINESS – The Chair announced that the unfinished business was the question on adoption of amendments which had been debated earlier and on which further proceedings had been postponed.
6:28:49 P.M. H.R. 1806 On agreeing to the Johnson, E. B. amendment; Failed by recorded vote: 177 – 243 (Roll no. 252).
6:32:39 P.M. H.R. 1806 On agreeing to the Griffith amendment; Agreed to by recorded vote: 234 – 183 (Roll no. 253).
6:36:26 P.M. H.R. 1806 On agreeing to the Lowenthal amendment; Failed by recorded vote: 187 – 236 (Roll no. 254).
6:41:44 P.M. H.R. 1806 On agreeing to the Bonamici amendment; Failed by recorded vote: 208 – 215 (Roll no. 255).
6:46:02 P.M. H.R. 1806 On agreeing to the Beyer amendment; Failed by recorded vote: 190 – 232 (Roll no. 256).
6:49:42 P.M. H.R. 1806 On agreeing to the Johnson, E. B. amendment; Failed by recorded vote: 179 – 239 (Roll no. 257).
6:49:50 P.M. H.R. 1806 The House rose from the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union to report H.R. 1806.
6:51:04 P.M. H.R. 1806 The previous question was ordered pursuant to the rule.
6:51:27 P.M. H.R. 1806 The House adopted the amendment in the nature of a substitute as agreed to by the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.
6:59:35 P.M. H.R. 1806 On passage Passed by recorded vote: 217 – 205 (Roll no. 258).
6:59:36 P.M. H.R. 1806 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
7:00:59 P.M. MOMENT OF SILENCE – The House observed a moment of silence in memory of our service men and women who were on the U.S. military helicopter in Nepal.
7:10:46 P.M. H.R. 880 On motion to recommit with instructions Failed by the Yeas and Nays: 181 – 240 (Roll no. 259).
7:17:58 P.M. H.R. 880 On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 274 – 145 (Roll no. 260).
7:17:59 P.M. H.R. 880 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
7:18:07 P.M. H. Res. 274 Considered as privileged matter. H. Res. 274 — “Providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 1335) to amend the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act to provide flexibility for fishery managers and stability for fishermen, and for other purposes.”
7:20:32 P.M. H. Res. 274 DEBATE – The House proceeded with one hour of debate on H. Res. 274.
7:59:01 P.M. H. Res. 274 The previous question was ordered without objection.
7:59:12 P.M. H. Res. 274 POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – The Chair put the question on adoption of the resolution and by voice vote, announced that they ayes had prevailed. Mr. Polis demanded the Yeas and Nays and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of adoption of the resolution until a time to be announced.
7:59:58 P.M. ONE MINUTE SPEECHES – The House proceeded with further one minute speeches.
8:02:50 P.M. SPECIAL ORDER SPEECHES – The House proceeded with Special Order speeches without prejudice to the possible return to legislative business.
8:29:00 P.M. Mr. Hice, Jody B. asked unanimous consent that when the House adjourns today, it adjourn to meet at 10:00 a.m. on May 21. Agreed to without objection.
8:30:00 P.M. SPECIAL ORDER SPEECHES – The House resumed Special Order speeches.
8:46:55 P.M. INSTITUTE OF AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE CULTURE AND A RTS DEVELOPMENT-Pursuant to 20 U.S.C. 4412, and the order of the House of January 6, 2015, the Speaker appointed the following member of the House to the BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE INSTITUTE OF AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE CULTURE AND ARTS DEVELOPMENT: Mr. Ben Ray Lujan of NM.
8:47:11 P.M. COMMISSION ON CARE – Pursuant to sec. 202(a) of the Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014 (Pub. L. 113-146), and the order of the House of Jan. 6, 2015, the Speaker appointed Mr. David P. Blom, Columbus, OH; Mr. Darin Selnick, Oceanside, CA; and Dr. Toby Cosgrove, Cleveland, OH.
8:48:00 P.M. MEXICO-UNITED STATES INTERPARLIAMENTARY GROUP – Pursuant to 22 U.S.C. 276h and the order of the House of January 6, 2015, the Speaker appointed the following members of the House to the MEXICO-UNITED STATES INTERPARLIAMENTARY GROUP: Ms. Linda T. Sanchez of CA, Mr. Gene Green of TX, Mr. Polis, Ms. Jackson Lee and Mrs. Torres.
8:49:00 P.M. SPECIAL ORDER SPEECHES – The House resumed Special Order speeches.
9:20:11 P.M. The Speaker announced that the House do now recess. The next meeting is subject to the call of the Chair.
10:00:01 P.M. The House convened, returning from a recess continuing the legislative day of May 20.
10:00:02 P.M. H. Con. Res. 47 Considered as privileged matter. H. Con. Res. 47 — “To correct the enrollment of S. 178.”
10:00:29 P.M. H. Con. Res. 47 On agreeing to the resolution Agreed to without objection.
10:00:35 P.M. H. Con. Res. 47 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
10:01:01 P.M. Mr. Poe (TX) moved that the House do now adjourn.
10:01:08 P.M. On motion to adjourn Agreed to by voice vote.
10:01:09 P.M. The House adjourned pursuant to a previous special order.

The next meeting is scheduled for 10:00 a.m. on May 21, 2015.

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